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Personal Bankruptcy: Tips For Starting Over With A Clean Slate

Even when faced with dire financial consequences, many people fear the prospect of filing personal bankruptcy. The key to defeating what can, often be, crippling anxiety is familiarizing yourself with the process and its potential benefits. Use the tips in this article to alleviate your fears and do what is necessary to get a fresh financial start.

If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

If you have to file bankruptcy, get a lawyer to look over your paperwork before you file. Bankruptcy laws can be very complex, and if you do not have a lawyer, you can get yourself in trouble. Not only are there legal issues that you could face, but you could also end up losing property and cash that you think are protected.

As filing bankruptcy becomes more of a reality, don’t use your entire savings or your retirement funds to pay creditors or attempt to resolve insolvency. Don’t touch retirement accounts unless you don’t have a choice. Though you may have to break into your savings, keep some available for difficult times. You will be glad you did.

Before you decide to file bankruptcy proceedings, determine which assets will be safe. The Bankruptcy Code has lists of various asset types that are exempt during the process. It is important that you read this list before filing for bankruptcy, so that can find out whether or not your most prized possessions will be seized. If you don’t read it, you could have nasty surprises pop up later due to your prized possessions being seized.

Make sure you have a solid understanding of which debts can be eliminated by bankruptcy, and which ones cannot. Debts like student loans, child support or alimony payments, and taxes, are generally not discharged through bankruptcy. Bankruptcy can help if your wages are being garnished or if you have large unsecured debts, like, credit cards and utility bills.

Brush up on the latest bankruptcy regulations before you decide whether or not to file. Bankruptcy laws are always changing, and you need to be aware of any changes so your bankruptcy can be properly filed. Check the website of your state’s legislation or get in contact with your local office to learn more about these important changes.

The specter of personal bankruptcy is something countless individuals dread and strive to avoid, no matter what. The truth is that a little bit of knowledge goes a long way toward making bankruptcy a less mysterious, more accessible opportunity for those who need it. Apply the advice contained in this piece, and you may find that bankruptcy represents a good solution for your circumstances.…